Difference between revisions of "How to Include Pictures, Equations, and Spreadsheets in Your Presentations and Lab Reports"

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<h2>Introduction</h2>
<h2>Introduction</h2>


<p>When you’re presenting your work, either in written (lab report) or oral
<p>When you're presenting your work, either in written (lab report) or oral
(presentation) form, it’s frequently a good idea to include other types of
(presentation) form, it's frequently a good idea to include other types of
material in addition to the normal words that Word and PowerPoint provide. This
material in addition to the normal words that Word and PowerPoint provide. This
document will describe how to do this. Since both products are part of the
document will describe how to do this. Since both products are part of the
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<h2>Pictures</h2>
<h2>Pictures</h2>


<p>In many ways, this is the easiest to do.  Most of the time, you’ll want to
<p>In many ways, this is the easiest to do.  Most of the time, you'll want to
include digital camera pictures taken during your lab or showing your project
include digital camera pictures taken during your lab or showing your project
or artwork you obtained (legally!) from other sources. Both Word and PowerPoint
or artwork you obtained (legally!) from other sources. Both Word and PowerPoint
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produced by the digital cameras used in the labs.</p>
produced by the digital cameras used in the labs.</p>


<h3>Office 2003</h3>
<h3>Inserting Pictures: Office 2003</h3>


<p>Once your have the data file for the picture, all you have to do in either
<p>Once your have the data file for the picture, all you have to do in either
Word or PowerPoint is click the “Insert�? item on the top menu bar. Among the
Word or PowerPoint is click the "Insert" item on the top menu bar. Among the
items in the drop down menu will be a “Picture�? item. If you don’t see it,
items in the drop down menu will be a "Picture" item. If you don't see it,
“hover�? the cursor over the menu for a few seconds and the menu will be
"hover" the cursor over the menu for a few seconds and the menu will be
expanded to show you all the menu items, so “Picture�? should now definitely be
expanded to show you all the menu items, so "Picture" should now definitely be
among them. When you click on “Picture�? another drop down menu appears. For the
among them. When you click on "Picture" another drop down menu appears. For the
type of pictures we’re describing here, choose “From file�?. When you click on
type of pictures we're describing here, choose "From file". When you click on
this item, a window will appear so you can find the file and include it. If
this item, a window will appear so you can find the file and include it. If
you’re lucky, you’ll already be in the right directory, but if not, you’ll have
you're lucky, you'll already be in the right directory, but if not, you'll have
to navigate to the proper place. When you get there, just double click on the
to navigate to the proper place. When you get there, just double click on the
picture you want and it will be automatically included into your work at the
picture you want and it will be automatically included into your work where
place where the cursor was.</p>
the cursor was placed</p>


<p>Frequently, the picture is the wrong size for what you want, either being
<p>Frequently, the picture is the wrong size for what you want, either being
too large or too small. You can resize the picture. First, click on the picture,
too large or too small. You can resize the picture. First, click on the picture,
and you’ll see a bunch of dots appear around the edge of the picture: one in
and you'll see a bunch of dots appear around the edge of the picture: one in
each corner of the picture and one in the middle of each edge. You can move the
each corner of the picture and one in the middle of each edge. You can move the
cursor over one of these dots and hold the left mouse button down to “drag�? the
cursor over one of these dots and hold the left mouse button down to "drag" the
dot, taking the picture with it. When you have the cursor where you want it,
dot, taking the picture with it. When you have the cursor where you want it,
let go of the left mouse button and your picture will be resized.</p>
let go of the left mouse button and your picture will be resized.</p>


You can also change the size and shape of the image if you want. If you click
<p>You can also change the size and shape of the image if you want. If you click
on the image, a frame will form around it with a small circle in each corner
on the image, a frame will form around it with a small circle in each corner
and a small square in the middle of each side. If you click on one of these,
and a small square in the middle of each side. If you click on one of these,
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If you click on one of the corner circles, it will resize the image, but keep
If you click on one of the corner circles, it will resize the image, but keep
it undistorted. Therefore, it is probably desirable to use the corner circles
it undistorted. Therefore, it is probably desirable to use the corner circles
when changing the size of the image.<p>Keep in mind that as you grow and shrink
when changing the size of the image.</p>
the picture, Word or PowerPoint will recalculate the picture and change its
 
resolution to fit the space you’re giving the picture. This means that a
<p>Keep in mind that as you grow and shrink the picture, Word or PowerPoint
picture that looks good in a small size might look “grainy�? when you make it
will recalculate the picture and change its resolution to fit the space you're
bigger. Make sure you consider the effects of changing size when you put it
giving the picture. This means that a picture that looks good in a small size
into your work.</p>
might look "grainy" when you make it bigger. Make sure you consider the effects
of changing size when you put it into your work.</p>


<p>There are also some considerations for the specific type of picture you’re
<p>There are also some considerations for the specific type of picture you're
including.</p>
including.</p>


<h3>Office 2007</h3>
<h3>Inserting Pictures: Office 2007</h3>


<p>Once your have the data file for the picture, all you have to do in either
<p>Once your have the data file for the picture, all you have to do in either
Word or PowerPoint is click the <b><i>Insert</i></b> tab on the ribbon. Click
Word or PowerPoint is click the <b><i>Insert</i></b> tab on the ribbon. Click
on the <b><i>Picture</i></b> icon in the <b><i>Illustrations</i></b> group. On
on the <b><i>Picture</i></b> icon in the <b><i>Illustrations</i></b> group. On
"Insert Picture" popup window that appears, if you’re lucky, you’ll already be
the "Insert Picture" popup window that appears, if you're lucky, you'll already
in the right directory, but if not, you’ll have to navigate to the proper
be in the right directory. If you're not, you'll have to navigate to the proper
place. When you get there, just double click on the picture you want and it
place. When you get there, just double click on the picture you want and it
will be automatically included into your work at the place where the cursor
will be automatically included into your work at the place where the cursor
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<p>Keep in mind that as you grow and shrink the picture, Word or PowerPoint
<p>Keep in mind that as you grow and shrink the picture, Word or PowerPoint
will recalculate the picture and change its resolution to fit the space you’re
will recalculate the picture and change its resolution to fit the space you're
giving the picture. This means that a picture that looks good in a small size
giving the picture. This means that a picture that looks good in a small size
might look “grainy�? when you make it bigger. Make sure you consider the effects
might look "grainy" when you make it bigger. Make sure you consider the effects
of changing size when you put it into your work.</p>
of size changes when you put it into your work.</p>


<p>There are also some considerations for the specific type of picture you’re
<p>There are also some considerations for the specific type of picture you're
including.</p>
including.</p>


<h3>Digital Pictures</h3>
<h3>Digital Pictures</h3>


<p>These pictures can usually be easily included in your document or
<p>Usually, these pictures can be easily included in your document or
presentation. However, keep in mind that documents are usually printed on black
presentation. However, keep in mind that documents are usually printed on black
and white printers, so color pictures are frequently translated into black and
and white printers, so color pictures are frequently translated into black and
white for printing. You should probably print your document yourself before
white for printing. You should probably print your document yourself before
submitting it to make sure it looks good, and that the picture doesn’t become a
submitting it to make sure it looks good, and that the picture doesn't become a
big black blob in the middle of the document.</p>
big black blob in the middle of the document.</p>


<h3>Scanned Images</h3>
<h3>Scanned Images</h3>


<p>Frequently, you’ll be scanning sketches or other work you’ve done by hand.
<p>Frequently, you'll be scanning sketches or other work you've done by hand.
When you scan your work, make sure it is scanned as dark as possible. You should
When you scan your work, make sure it is scanned as dark as possible. You should
set the exposure so that the image does not contain black speckles, but is as
set the exposure so that the image does not contain black speckles, but is as
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<p>For a Word document, something that looks good on your laptop probably will
<p>For a Word document, something that looks good on your laptop probably will
look good when it’s printed. However, PowerPoint presentations are an entirely
look good when it's printed. However, PowerPoint presentations are an entirely
different matter. When you include a scanned image onto a slide, any video
different matter. When you include a scanned image onto a slide, any video
projector usually “bleeds�? the while background into the lines, making them much
projector usually "bleeds" the white background into the lines, making them much
thinner and lighter. This means that a scanned image which looks good on a
thinner and lighter. This means that a scanned image which looks good on a
laptop or other display frequently comes out very light, if not invisible, when
laptop or other display frequently comes out very light, if not invisible, when
it’s projected onto a screen. This is why you should scan the image as dark as
it's projected onto a screen. This is why you should scan the image as dark as
possible. A very dark image will “brighten�? on a video projector and turn out to
possible. A very dark image will "brighten" on a video projector and turn out to
be just about what you want when it’s projected on the screen.</p>
be just about what you want when it's projected on the screen.</p>


<h2>Equations</h2>
<h2>Equations</h2>


<p>You’ll find it necessary to include equations in your work. There are two
<p>You'll find it necessary to include equations in your work. There are two
ways to do this. Many of these equations are contained in the online manual as
ways to do this. Many of these equations are contained in the online manual as
images, so it would be tempting to copy the picture from your Web browser and
images, so it would be tempting to copy the picture from your Web browser and
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<li>Since the online manual has a white background, the equation image does as
<li>Since the online manual has a white background, the equation image does as
well. For a Word document, this is usually acceptable. However, with PowerPoint,
well. For a Word document, this is usually acceptable. However, with PowerPoint,
unless you use a white background, the results will not look good. You’ll have
unless you use a white background, the results will not look good. You'll have
your slide background with the equation image (and its white background)
your slide background with the equation image (and its white background)
superimposed on it, giving the impression that a hole was cut in the background.
superimposed on it, giving the impression that a hole was cut in the background.
This doesn’t look good.</li>
This doesn't look good.</li>


<li>If you work with the image repeatedly, growing and shrinking it, the nature
<li>If you work with the image repeatedly, growing and shrinking it, the nature
of JPEG means you will lose detail each time you work with the image. This is not
of JPEG means you will lose detail each time you work with the image. This is not
widely known, but is easily noticeable to a trained eye. A JPEG image is fine for
widely known, but is easily noticeable to a trained eye. A JPEG image is fine for
just inserting the image, but it’s likely that you’ll have to work with it,
just inserting the image, but it's likely that you'll have to work with it,
possibly multiple times, before you get it right, causing a loss of resolution,
possibly multiple times, before you get it right, causing a loss of resolution,
and making the image look even more grainy.</li>
and making the image look even more grainy.</li>
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<p>The better way is to enter the equation directly into your work. Like using
<p>The better way is to enter the equation directly into your work. Like using
pictures, this is easy. On the top menu bar, select “Insert�?. When the drop
pictures, this is easy. On the top menu bar, select "Insert". When the drop
down menu appears, select “Object�?. This will bring up a window showing the
down menu appears, select "Object". This will bring up a window showing the
various kinds of objects you can create, in alphabetical order. Scroll down the  
various kinds of objects you can create, in alphabetical order. Scroll down the  
list looking for “Microsoft Equation�? and click on it. You can now enter the
list looking for "Microsoft Equation" and click on it. You can now enter the
equation.</p>
equation.</p>


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do this and make the equation look professional.</p>
do this and make the equation look professional.</p>


<p>After you’ve completed the equation, it will now look professional –
<p>After you've completed the equation, it will now look professional –
something you can be proud of.</p>
something you can be proud of.</p>


<hh3>Office 2007</h3>
<h3>Office 2007</h3>


<p>The better way is to enter the equation directly into your work. In Office
<p>The better way is to enter the equation directly into your work. In Office
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make the equation look professional.</p>
make the equation look professional.</p>


<p>After you’ve completed the equation, it will now look professional –
<p>After you've completed the equation, it will now look professional –
something you can be proud of.</p>
something you can be proud of.</p>


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<p>The method to do this is very similar to an equation, where you select
<p>The method to do this is very similar to an equation, where you select
“Insert�? off the menu bar, then “Object�?, and in the window, select “Microsoft
"Insert" off the menu bar, then "Object", and in the window, select "Microsoft
Excel Worksheet�?. This will bring up a live spreadsheet that you can work with
Excel Worksheet". This will bring up a live spreadsheet that you can work with
directly. The menu bars and some other Excel features will be missing, but you
directly. The menu bars and some other Excel features will be missing, but you
can still obtain them by selecting the cells you want to change and then
can still obtain them by selecting the cells you want to change and then
clicking the right button on the mouse that will bring up a popup menu of what
clicking the right button on the mouse that will bring up a popup menu of what
you can do with the cells. You’ll almost always find what you want by exploring
you can do with the cells. You'll almost always find what you want by exploring
these menus. Also, the default spreadsheet almost always has more cells than
these menus. Also, the default spreadsheet almost always has more cells than
you need. If you look at the spreadsheet, you’ll see dots around the edges,
you need. If you look at the spreadsheet, you'll see dots around the edges,
like you did with pictures. The dots work in a similar way, where you can
like you did with pictures. The dots work in a similar way, where you can
change the number of rows in the sheet by dragging the bottom middle dot, the
change the number of rows in the sheet by dragging the bottom middle dot, the
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using the dots, and using the standard Excel features to change the row height
using the dots, and using the standard Excel features to change the row height
and column width, you can get an extremely professional-looking product. When
and column width, you can get an extremely professional-looking product. When
you’re done with the spreadsheet, click on some other part of your work and
you're done with the spreadsheet, click on some other part of your work and
you’ll see the result. If you don’t like it, just double click on the
you'll see the result. If you don't like it, just double click on the
spreadsheet and you can work on it some more to make it look good. This
spreadsheet and you can work on it some more to make it look good. This
approach will almost always give you the best results.</p>
approach will almost always give you the best results.</p>
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icons, but you can still do what you want. Just select the cells you want to
icons, but you can still do what you want. Just select the cells you want to
change and click the right button on the mouse, which will bring up a popup
change and click the right button on the mouse, which will bring up a popup
menu of what you can do with the cells. You’ll almost always find what you want
menu of what you can do with the cells. You'll almost always find what you want
by exploring these menus. Also, the default spreadsheet almost always has more
by exploring these menus. Also, the default spreadsheet almost always has more
cells than you need. If you look at the spreadsheet, you’ll see dots around the
cells than you need. If you look at the spreadsheet, you'll see dots around the
edges, similar to the one that you had for pictures. The dots work in a similar
edges, similar to the one that you had for pictures. The dots work in a similar
way, where you can change the number of rows in the sheet by dragging the
way, where you can change the number of rows in the sheet by dragging the
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change the cell contents, using the dots, and using the standard Excel features
change the cell contents, using the dots, and using the standard Excel features
to change the row height and column width, you can get an extremely
to change the row height and column width, you can get an extremely
professional-looking product. When you’re done with the spreadsheet, click on
professional-looking product. When you're done with the spreadsheet, click on
some other part of your work and you’ll see the result. If you don’t like it,
some other part of your work and you'll see the result. If you don't like it,
just double click on the spreadsheet and you can work on it some more to make
just double click on the spreadsheet and you can work on it some more to make
it look good. This approach will almost always give you the best results.</p>
it look good. This approach will almost always give you the best results.</p>
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result as a picture into your work. This is usually the worst alternative. As we
result as a picture into your work. This is usually the worst alternative. As we
described above, the image will typically look grainy compared to the result by
described above, the image will typically look grainy compared to the result by
using the spreadsheet itself, and you’ll have a white background. As with
using the spreadsheet itself, and you'll have a white background. As with
pictures that are cut and pasted, the results will probably look amateurish, not
pictures that are cut and pasted, the results will probably look amateurish, not
nearly as good as the other approaches described above.</p>
nearly as good as the other approaches described above.</p>
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<p>By using these techniques, you can produce work that will rival that done by
<p>By using these techniques, you can produce work that will rival that done by
trained professionals, and make an extremely good impression. All of your work
trained professionals, and make an extremely good impression. All of your work
in EG1004 should take advantage of them.</p>
in EG1003 should take advantage of them.</p>


[[Main_Page | Return to Table of Contents]]
[[Main_Page | Return to Table of Contents]]

Latest revision as of 03:06, 11 July 2011

How to Include Pictures, Equations, and Spreadsheets in Your Presentations and Lab Reports

Introduction

When you're presenting your work, either in written (lab report) or oral (presentation) form, it's frequently a good idea to include other types of material in addition to the normal words that Word and PowerPoint provide. This document will describe how to do this. Since both products are part of the Microsoft Office suite, the way you do this is very similar for both systems.

Pictures

In many ways, this is the easiest to do. Most of the time, you'll want to include digital camera pictures taken during your lab or showing your project or artwork you obtained (legally!) from other sources. Both Word and PowerPoint accept pictures in a wide variety of formats, including the JPEG format produced by the digital cameras used in the labs.

Inserting Pictures: Office 2003

Once your have the data file for the picture, all you have to do in either Word or PowerPoint is click the "Insert" item on the top menu bar. Among the items in the drop down menu will be a "Picture" item. If you don't see it, "hover" the cursor over the menu for a few seconds and the menu will be expanded to show you all the menu items, so "Picture" should now definitely be among them. When you click on "Picture" another drop down menu appears. For the type of pictures we're describing here, choose "From file". When you click on this item, a window will appear so you can find the file and include it. If you're lucky, you'll already be in the right directory, but if not, you'll have to navigate to the proper place. When you get there, just double click on the picture you want and it will be automatically included into your work where the cursor was placed

Frequently, the picture is the wrong size for what you want, either being too large or too small. You can resize the picture. First, click on the picture, and you'll see a bunch of dots appear around the edge of the picture: one in each corner of the picture and one in the middle of each edge. You can move the cursor over one of these dots and hold the left mouse button down to "drag" the dot, taking the picture with it. When you have the cursor where you want it, let go of the left mouse button and your picture will be resized.

You can also change the size and shape of the image if you want. If you click on the image, a frame will form around it with a small circle in each corner and a small square in the middle of each side. If you click on one of these, and drag the mouse, it will resize the image in various ways. If you click on one of the squares on the sides of the image, it will stretch and shrink the image in the horizontal direction. Similarly, if you click on one of the squares on the top or bottom, it will stretch and shrink the image vertically. If you click on one of the corner circles, it will resize the image, but keep it undistorted. Therefore, it is probably desirable to use the corner circles when changing the size of the image.

Keep in mind that as you grow and shrink the picture, Word or PowerPoint will recalculate the picture and change its resolution to fit the space you're giving the picture. This means that a picture that looks good in a small size might look "grainy" when you make it bigger. Make sure you consider the effects of changing size when you put it into your work.

There are also some considerations for the specific type of picture you're including.

Inserting Pictures: Office 2007

Once your have the data file for the picture, all you have to do in either Word or PowerPoint is click the Insert tab on the ribbon. Click on the Picture icon in the Illustrations group. On the "Insert Picture" popup window that appears, if you're lucky, you'll already be in the right directory. If you're not, you'll have to navigate to the proper place. When you get there, just double click on the picture you want and it will be automatically included into your work at the place where the cursor was.

Keep in mind that as you grow and shrink the picture, Word or PowerPoint will recalculate the picture and change its resolution to fit the space you're giving the picture. This means that a picture that looks good in a small size might look "grainy" when you make it bigger. Make sure you consider the effects of size changes when you put it into your work.

There are also some considerations for the specific type of picture you're including.

Digital Pictures

Usually, these pictures can be easily included in your document or presentation. However, keep in mind that documents are usually printed on black and white printers, so color pictures are frequently translated into black and white for printing. You should probably print your document yourself before submitting it to make sure it looks good, and that the picture doesn't become a big black blob in the middle of the document.

Scanned Images

Frequently, you'll be scanning sketches or other work you've done by hand. When you scan your work, make sure it is scanned as dark as possible. You should set the exposure so that the image does not contain black speckles, but is as dark as possible.

For a Word document, something that looks good on your laptop probably will look good when it's printed. However, PowerPoint presentations are an entirely different matter. When you include a scanned image onto a slide, any video projector usually "bleeds" the white background into the lines, making them much thinner and lighter. This means that a scanned image which looks good on a laptop or other display frequently comes out very light, if not invisible, when it's projected onto a screen. This is why you should scan the image as dark as possible. A very dark image will "brighten" on a video projector and turn out to be just about what you want when it's projected on the screen.

Equations

You'll find it necessary to include equations in your work. There are two ways to do this. Many of these equations are contained in the online manual as images, so it would be tempting to copy the picture from your Web browser and then copy it into your work. This has a number of drawbacks:

  • The image will typically look grainy. When Word or PowerPoint displays your work, it typically displays it at the highest resolution the output device is capable of generating. The online manual images are designed to be shown at a relatively small size as part of the manual text. When you enlarge the equation using the techniques in the earlier section, its low resolution becomes apparent.
  • Since the online manual has a white background, the equation image does as well. For a Word document, this is usually acceptable. However, with PowerPoint, unless you use a white background, the results will not look good. You'll have your slide background with the equation image (and its white background) superimposed on it, giving the impression that a hole was cut in the background. This doesn't look good.
  • If you work with the image repeatedly, growing and shrinking it, the nature of JPEG means you will lose detail each time you work with the image. This is not widely known, but is easily noticeable to a trained eye. A JPEG image is fine for just inserting the image, but it's likely that you'll have to work with it, possibly multiple times, before you get it right, causing a loss of resolution, and making the image look even more grainy.

Office 2003

The better way is to enter the equation directly into your work. Like using pictures, this is easy. On the top menu bar, select "Insert". When the drop down menu appears, select "Object". This will bring up a window showing the various kinds of objects you can create, in alphabetical order. Scroll down the list looking for "Microsoft Equation" and click on it. You can now enter the equation.

The exact way of entering the equation and editing it is beyond the scope of this page. However, you can read the online manual page Making Good Looking Equations in PowerPoint Presentations to learn how to do this and make the equation look professional.

After you've completed the equation, it will now look professional – something you can be proud of.

Office 2007

The better way is to enter the equation directly into your work. In Office 2007 equations are text, and can be manipulated similar to normal text. Click on the Insert tab on the ribbon. Now click on the Equation icon in the Symbols group all the way on the right side of the ribbon. This will automatically switch you to the Design tab. You can now enter your equation just like you did in the first lab.

If you're using PowerPoint, you may want to read the online manual page Making Good Looking Equations in PowerPoint Presentations to learn how to make the equation look professional.

After you've completed the equation, it will now look professional – something you can be proud of.


Spreadsheets

Like equations, spreadsheets are frequently needed in your work, and there are several ways to include them in your work. The first way is to prepare the spreadsheet in Excel and then copy it into your work. This will turn the cells you selected in Excel into a text table for inclusion in your work. For Word, you will get a default table size big enough to hold the cells. For PowerPoint, the table will generally fill most, if not all, of the slide, but still with the same font and type size you used in Excel, usually resulting in very large cells with very small text in them. In both cases, you can resize things to get what you want.

The second way is to create the spreadsheet directly in your work, like you did with an equation.

Second way - Office 2003

The method to do this is very similar to an equation, where you select "Insert" off the menu bar, then "Object", and in the window, select "Microsoft Excel Worksheet". This will bring up a live spreadsheet that you can work with directly. The menu bars and some other Excel features will be missing, but you can still obtain them by selecting the cells you want to change and then clicking the right button on the mouse that will bring up a popup menu of what you can do with the cells. You'll almost always find what you want by exploring these menus. Also, the default spreadsheet almost always has more cells than you need. If you look at the spreadsheet, you'll see dots around the edges, like you did with pictures. The dots work in a similar way, where you can change the number of rows in the sheet by dragging the bottom middle dot, the number of columns by dragging the right edge dot, or both at once by using the dot in the bottom right corner. By right clicking to change the cell contents, using the dots, and using the standard Excel features to change the row height and column width, you can get an extremely professional-looking product. When you're done with the spreadsheet, click on some other part of your work and you'll see the result. If you don't like it, just double click on the spreadsheet and you can work on it some more to make it look good. This approach will almost always give you the best results.

Second way - Office 2007

The method to do this is very similar to an equation. Click on the Insert tab on the ribbon, and then click on the Object icon in the Text group. In the Object window that pops up, scroll down the Create New menu until you see "Microsoft Office Excel Worksheet" and double click on this item. This will bring up a live spreadsheet that you can work with directly. The ribbons will be slightly different and will be missing some icons, but you can still do what you want. Just select the cells you want to change and click the right button on the mouse, which will bring up a popup menu of what you can do with the cells. You'll almost always find what you want by exploring these menus. Also, the default spreadsheet almost always has more cells than you need. If you look at the spreadsheet, you'll see dots around the edges, similar to the one that you had for pictures. The dots work in a similar way, where you can change the number of rows in the sheet by dragging the bottom middle dot, the number of columns by dragging the right edge dot, or both at once by using the dot in the bottom right corner. By right clicking to change the cell contents, using the dots, and using the standard Excel features to change the row height and column width, you can get an extremely professional-looking product. When you're done with the spreadsheet, click on some other part of your work and you'll see the result. If you don't like it, just double click on the spreadsheet and you can work on it some more to make it look good. This approach will almost always give you the best results.

Third way

The third way is to do your work in Excel, take a screen shot of the Excel spreadsheet, and then use Paint to select what you want, and then insert the result as a picture into your work. This is usually the worst alternative. As we described above, the image will typically look grainy compared to the result by using the spreadsheet itself, and you'll have a white background. As with pictures that are cut and pasted, the results will probably look amateurish, not nearly as good as the other approaches described above.

Summary

By using these techniques, you can produce work that will rival that done by trained professionals, and make an extremely good impression. All of your work in EG1003 should take advantage of them.

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